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Flower care

Flower care instructions for our most common flowers

Freesia

1.    Place the flowers in cold water and add soem cut flower food to the water. Take away any leaves that fall below the water level to prevent or slow bacteria growth.

2.    The flowers thrive in well lit environments, but avoid direct sunlight. Also, avoid placing Fressia near ripening or sitting fruit- ripening fruit emits Ethlyne and can reduce cut flowers lifespan.

3.    Change the water every third day, and in order to keep the flowers last as long as possible. be srue to remove any wilted blooms.

Gerbera

1.    Cut the stems with a sharp knife and fill a vase with approximately 10 cm (6 in.) of room temperature water and some cut flower food. Gerberas are sensitive to bacteria, so see to it that they are placed in a washed vase.

2.    Be sure not to set the gerberas in a place too warm or that receives direct sunlight. Additionally, avoid placing Gerberas near ripening or sitting fruit- ripening fruit emits Ethylene and enzymes that reduce cut flowers lifespan.

3.    Take away any leaves to come under water or lie at the water level. When the flowers begin to bow and droop, make a fresh cut off the stems to lower the flowers height and also change the water.

Hydrangeas

1.    Cut the flowers’ stems at an angle and with a sharp knife and take away all leaves that are under or even just at the water level.

2.    Hydrangeas should be placed in a vase with a fair bit of lukewarm water and some cut flower food. Be sure to keep the water level filled and give the stems a fresh cut every other day.

3.    Hydrangeas are noticeably sensitive to drafty conditions, so place them in a position where they will be undisturbed by breezes or windy conditions.

Chrysanthemums (Mums)

1.    Cut the flowers with a sharp knife as possible, always avoid using scissors because they cause damage to the flowers water channels and reduce water uptake. Take away any leaves that fall below the water level to prevent or slow bacteria growth.

2.    Add cut flower food to the vase with water. Water temperature should be commensurate with the quality of the flowers’ stems- if the stems are very firm, use warmer water; if the stems are softer then lukewarm water is good.

3.    Mums should be in a well-lit place in your home but not direct sunlight. Change all the water at least one time per week and feel free to give fresh cuts on the stems once or twice a week.

Lilies

1.    Cut the flowers’ stems and place them room temperature water. Lilies are thirsty flowers so be sure to attend to the water regularly and use cut flower food.

2.    Take away any leaves that fall below the water level to prevent or slow bacteria growth.

3.    Position your lilies in cooler locations and avoid placing Gerberas near ripening or sitting fruit- ripening fruit emits Ethylene and enzymes that reduce cut flowers lifespan.

4.    Lilies’ pollen is usuallycolourfuland can easilydiscolourthe blossoms; this can lessen the glamour of the flowers and if you desire you can take away larger spots of pollen with a bit of tape.

Carnations

1.    Cut Carnations’ stems on an angle and have them placed in lukewarm water with some cut flower food.

2.    Take away any leaves that fall below the water level to prevent or slow bacteria growth. If the flower stems show many buds, you can use warmer water to try to promote further blooming.

3.    Change the water every other day or every third day at the latest, and give the stems a fresh cut when you do this.

 
4.    Don’t forget- Carnations are renowned for their strong bouquet and may give rise to allergy symptoms.


Orchids

1.    Orchids will most often have as much light as possible, but direct sunlight is to be avoided. The flowers are quite happy to be placed in a location that has a 5 ºC difference between day and night (~10 ºF).

2.    Water theflower by either immersing the pot in water or placing the pot in a wide bucket and watering until most of the pot standin water. Remove the pot immediatelyand avoid getting water on the leaves because it can cause premature degradation of the orchids.

3.    Water your orchids approximately once a week and never allow orchids to have roots in standing water. Orchids are drought tolerant but very sensitive to over watering. Also, during winter months, it is possible to water as seldom as every other month, depending on varieties.

4.    If you choose to use orchid food (fertilizer), use only designated sorts and only during the growing seasons.


Ranunculus

1.    Cut the flowers’ stems with a sharp knife and place them in cold water with cut flower food.  The water should be no warmer than 20 ºC(65 ºF).

2.    Take away any leaves that fall below the water level to prevent or slow bacteria growth.

3.    To give you Ranunculus the best lifespan, place them in a cool and well-lit location, but not in direct sunlight. As with many flowers, Ranunculus are sensitive to the chemicals emitted by ripening fruit, so avoid proximate locations.


Roses

1. Leave the roses still bound in the florist’s wrapping, with the stems exposed from the paper. Be sure that there are no leaves or thorns below the binding site of the bouquet.

2. Pour some warm water, 50 – 60 ºC (120 - 140 ºF) and mix in some cut flower food. Cut the roses’ stems and take away at least 2 cm from the bottom.


3. Quickly have the roses placed in the water especially after the fresh cut, air in the water channels of the roses will cause ”nodding” in the roses.

4. After approximately 30 minutes, take away all the wrapping and top off the water as needed. If the water begins to could, change the water directly and add new cut flower food.


Tulips

1. Cut the tulips’ stems approximately 1 cm from the bottom, with as sharp a knife as possible. As with roses, leave the tulips wrapped in the florist’s paper. Fill a vase with cold water and set the tulips in the vase still wrapped.

 
2. Leave the tulips inside the wrappings for a few hours before removing them. Place the flowers in a cool place and avoid direct sunlight.

3. Change the tulips water every other day, and cut the flowers’ stems nearly as often. As with many cut flowers, place them a fair distance away from any standing, ripening fruit.